Book Review: The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman

It has been a few weeks since I’ve posted and this is not due to a dearth of reading material, let me tell you. I just started my summer job and it’s been a little exhausting trying to find a moment for myself while juggling my job and other responsibilities and still trying to have some summer fun. I feel a little more at ease now and am happy to return to my blog! My other issue was that I had been weirdly locked out of my WordPress Account for a week or two so I’m glad to be back with full access! I’ve also been racing to get my visa paperwork through for my impending move to France which has been a slog but I can finally see the light! I actually finished this book in the same week as the other two in the trilogy but was unable to take time for put down my thoughts. After having finished all three books, I can still say that I loved the trilogy and enjoyed the ride. Each book had a different flavor and overarching themes but I really enjoyed them all. I will say that Pullman seems to have shifted direction a little bit in the last book but I still loved the story. So without further ado, The Amber Spyglass!

At the end of the Subtle Knife, Will gained possession of the Subtle Knife and Lyra was stolen away by her own mother, ostensibly for her own protection. The Magisterium is hot on Mrs. Coulter’s trail and decides to destroy Lyra for her role in the upcoming battle between Lord Asriel and the Magisterium. However, Lyra and Will find themselves pursuing a parallel adventure in search of Roger, Lyra’s old friend from her days at Oxford College. At the end of the book, the Magisterium and the Authority battle with Lord Asriel for cosmic control of the universe while Lyra discovers just how painful the sacrifices can be. Honestly, I was about halfway through this book while getting my car serviced and I legitimately began to cry in the middle of a car dealership because of how invested I had gotten and how painful things were in the book. Pullman did a wonderful job of animating each character and you can feel their joy and happiness and pain and sorrow just as if it was your own. This book really did destroy me a little bit and I do not regret that experience. I would recommend reading the whole series, I would absolutely not read this as a stand alone book as it is too intertwined with the broader narrative within the trilogy. I also didn’t think that it was as blasphemous as was claimed before I read the book. I’ll leave it there because to give much more detail would spoil the book. I hope I haven’t been too vague about the book, I just don’t want to give away precious details that the reader should discover on their own. I loved the trilogy and I hope that all young adults get the chance to read it. Happy Reading!

Book Review: The Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman

I’m glad that I was able to grab this book right away after finishing The Golden Compass because I don’t know what I would have done otherwise. I raced through this book, absolutely devouring each page. I think I finished it in a day or two and I read it so quickly after The Golden Compass that I was debating putting the two together in a book review. However, the plots differ quite a bit and I felt that it was unfair to the author to lump them together even if they were a delight to devour one after the other. This book was just as magical to me as The Golden Compass. Pullman creates new main characters that he is able to masterfully tie into the main storyline as if they were meant to be there all along. It makes me wonder if he had mapped out the wider story before writing The Golden Compass or if it was the product of workshopping various ideas together to fill out Lyra’s universe. Either way, what a book! It did get a little confusing at points because Pullman introduces SO much new material in this book and just expects the reader to absorb it as quickly as he’s writing it. In order to clarify things, let me explain the plot briefly to help you get your bearings a little better.

By the end of the first book, Lord Asriel has jumped into another world and Lyra decides to pursue. However, she ends up in an entirely different world, our own. She meets a young boy, Will, and they begin to search for Will’s father, John Parry. Still in Lyra’s world, the witches and Lee Scoresby seek out Lyra by any means possible. Lee Scoresby searches for Stanislaus Grumman in an effort to locate an entrance into the world where Lyra is. At the end, all are reunited, Grumman, Lyra, Will, and the witches but all is not what it seems. Meanwhile, Lyra is still being pursued by the dreadful Mrs. Coulter and has to evade her minions throughout the book. The hallmark of this new book is the world hopping, which Will and Lyra do multiple times in an effort to evade their enemies. This world hopping can be disorienting to the reader but Pullman describes each new world with a few specific clues that readers can use to distinguish where Lyra and Will have ended up. Pullman does a great job of giving each of these worlds their own characteristics and paints a rich picture of a multiverse where Lyra and Will can traverse across many unique worlds. I loved this book just as much as The Golden Compass and hope that my readers get the chance to read this book as well as The Golden Compass. I would recommend against reading the books out of order as you may lack crucial information from the previous book. Happy Reading!

Book Review: The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman

This book review has been a long time coming! It’s been over a month since my last post and I appreciate the patience as I tackle a few old challenges and some new adventures! Finals were tough and I’m happy to be back at home and up to my old tricks once again! I’ve tried a few times to read The Golden Compass and almost finished it last time but didn’t quite get there. This time, I borrowed the whole series and set out to read them all. And WOW was I shocked at how good these books were. At the moment, I’m already halfway through the third book and the review for the second book should be out sometime soon. Pullman does an incredible job of creating entire new worlds that seemed pulled from nowhere and investing the reader into the little life of Lyra. I would like to address the biggest controversy around the books, which is that they are heretical or anti-God. I didn’t really understand why these claims were being made until I reached the end of the first book, then the lightbulb went off. They do have a distinctly anti-organized religion bent and one could even say they are anti-God. However, these are fantasy novels and are not being presented as factual by Pullman. I feel that they might not be appropriate reading for a very religiously focused household but I think that with the use of deeper literary analysis, these books can be understood just fine. I also have a strict policy of not throwing the baby out with the bathwater. These books contain some fantastic writing and I feel transported every time I open them. Some people may take offense at the longer plot points but I don’t think that is any reason to deprive yourself of some truly fantastic fiction. With the elephant in the room addressed, let’s move on to the actual book!

The Golden Compass follows Lyra Belacqua, a precocious eleven year old and her beloved daemon, Pantalaimon. Lyra has grown up running feral through the halls of Jordan College in Oxford and becomes swept away from her beloved home and friends in a tide of destiny. She travels with gypsies, explores the Arctic, befriends an armored bear, and confronts the horrors sponsored by her own mother. By the end she is reunited with Lord Asriel, her guardian but that is certainly not the end of her story. Lyra uses her wits and innocence to bend others to her will and complete her destiny. Lyra is a wonderful character and following her journey in the book was a joy. Not only is Lyra a marvel of literary creation, all of the lands that she travels through are described so vividly that they feel as real as the chair that I’m sitting on while I read. If you couldn’t already tell, I loved this book. I know that it’s classified as young adult fiction but I really felt that it was a book that was more meant for adults? I enjoyed it much more as a young woman than I would have in my younger years.