Book Review: Monsters of Men

I could not believe how fast I finished this book. It’s the third in the Chaos Walking Trilogy by Patrick Ness that I posted about about a week ago. Wow!!!! This was a thrilling conclusion to the books and most of it was totally unexpected and the action kept coming! I started on a Wednesday and finished by Thursday evening! I absolutely ripped through this book and am still reeling from the ending!

The last installment of Ness’ trilogy brings us right back to the end of the second book, The Ask and the Answer. Just as Mayor Prentiss and Mistriss Coyle are about to have their epic showdown, their rivalry has to be put on pause to combat the massive Spackle army that has marched on their city. The Spackle previously appeared in the trilogy but not as main protagonists. When the settlers from the Old World settled on the New, a massive Spackle war ensued with several thousand Spackle being enslaved to the settlers as part of the peace agreement. These enslaved Spackle are slaughtered wholesale by Mayor Prentiss in the second book, leading to the mobilization of the Spackle across the planet. In the third book, the settlers face extinction in the face of the imminent arrival of more settlers and the rivalries of the second book haven’t gone anywhere. Tension is high and Todd and Viola are doing all they can to save each other while saving the rest of humanity but will they succeed and keep their lives?? You’ll have to read the book to find out!

I talked over the entire trilogy with the aforementioned friend who introduced me to the trilogy and we both had some pretty strong opinions about each of the characters in a world where nothing is quite black and white. I found that this trilogy is incredibly insightful in its treatment of humans and the basic moral battle of good versus evil that has faced humanity for many millennia. Ness does a really good job of showing how easy it is for evil to seep into our lives but encouragingly shows how to confront that same evil. I cannot believe how much I enjoyed reading these books and would recommend them to YA lovers. It provides a layered and nuanced story that makes you question even your own perceptions of the world.

Book Review: The Ask and the Answer

It’s been a hot minute since I’ve had time to review a book but I absolutely raced through this one! I started in on a Sunday night and was finished by the next evening, I just couldn’t put it down! This novel is the second in the Chaos Walking trilogy by Patrick Ness. I was introduced to this trilogy by a dear friend from high school who kindly provided the first one, “The Knife of Never Letting Go”. Unfortunately, I was hooked on that book and finished it with similar speed and my friend did not have the rest of the trilogy so I had to wait! I was able to find the second and third books on Thriftbooks at the end of July and was very excited to dive into the world of Patrick Ness once again!

The Chaos Walking trilogy tells the story of the settlements on a New World after the inhabitants of the Old World had to leave it. The series specifically follows Todd, a young man born in the New World settlement of Prentisstown where there are no women, and Viola, a scout from a new group of settlers from the Old World. “The Knife of Never Letting Go” follows Todd and Viola as they race to stop Mayor Prentiss from conquering the other settlements of the New World. The second book focuses on what happens after they fail and Mayor Prentiss becomes President Prentiss of the New World. Viola and Todd are separated and have to find themselves before they can find each other once again.

This novel is nuanced and absolutely devastating at points. It asks the questions that we are often afraid to ask in our day and age of the Trump Presidency. It asks how far will you go to save your own skin? Ness also explores the power of the individual throughout the novel which I found very thought provoking. I think this book is appropriate for 10 and up and especially for adults but it does contain dark topics so read with discretion. I cannot wait to read the next one to learn the final fates of Todd and Viola.

Book Review: Courting Darkness by Robin LaFevers

Wow! I just finished this book a night or two ago and wow! We love a book that sets up the next one in a series….Honestly, it was a great read for me but I do get a little frustrated when it feels like the whole book is just the lead up to another book. That being said, this book was absolutely action packed! There are queens and assassins and ambushes and prisoners and a little bit of history! This book is actually the fourth in a series by LaFevers and I have thoroughly enjoyed both this book and the preceding novels.

LaFevers recreates Brittany during the war torn years before it merged with the larger state of France. The main characters, Sybella and Genevieve are daughters of death in a literal sense that the Breton god of Death is their actual father but they’ve also been schooled in the killing arts. Honestly, this book is absolutely classic Young Adult fiction and I absolutely devoured it. Sybella is definitely my favorite character of the book, she had her stand alone novel as the second in the series but she is no less a delight to follow in this novel. I also find her character highly relatable and wish that I had her AMAZING skills. I would recommend this novel and series to a reader on the older end of the young adult reading spectrum, probably no one younger than 15 as there is some content of a sexual and adult nature. That being said, I did start the series when I was slightly younger than 15 so who am I to say anything about it. I hope that you enjoy LaFevers’ work just as much as I did, there’s really nothing like diving into the rich world of Brittany and the complex female characters that populate this series.

Book Review: A Bite Sized History of France

Ah yes, yet another book review regarding my research on France! Oh boy! Actually, my mother very kindly got me this book while I was recovering from my wisdom teeth surgery, which took much longer that I had thought. She is a thoughtful and wonderful person and I am so glad that she found this book! It was an absolute delight to read and can be read very fast or very slow. The book is structured into small chapters that each contain an anecdote about French cuisine and its’ link to French history. As I haven’t done that much research into the past of France, it was a good primer on French history for a foreigner. It also featured all sorts of regional French cuisine and was a tasty exploration of French food.

This book can be read by readers of all ages and enjoyed by all! It did make me a little hungry every time that I cracked it open but that’s a minor problem and not a bad one to have! It was a joyous celebration of the role of food in the storied past of France while tastefully acknowledging the darker side of French history. One of the things that I thought was well-addressed on a surface level was France’s colonial past and direct role within the North Atlantic Slave trade. This book was also a good debunker of many french myths surrounding their own cuisine and was an all-around good read! I would absolutely recommend this book to all and hope that many more get to enjoy the delights of this particular tome!

Book Review: A Wizard of Earthsea

It’s been a rough summer for everyone around the world right now, with raging coronavirus and protests over the systemic inequalities within our society so I decided it was a great time to get my wisdom teeth out because I wanted to add some more pain and suffering into my life…yay? This past week has been pretty miserable for me so I took the time to watch four whole seasons of Grantchester (fantastic but a lil moody) on Prime and finish up this little book. A Wizard of Earthsea was Ursula Le Guin’s breakout novel, leading to a longer series that follows the exploits of Sparrowhawk, the most powerful sorcerer in all of Earthsea. I’ve been reading a fair amount of non-fiction recently, with all my France research, and decided that this would be a lovely fantasy book vacation.

I did like this book but did not find that I preferred it over many of the more modern fantasy writers that I’ve read. Le Guin’s style is revolutionary for her time but appears a bit dated to the reader who have such a large collection of available books of fantasy and science fiction from female writers. Furthermore, I have always found books with a male protagonist to be a little harder for me to read. I’m not sure why, but I think that in fantasy I like to envision myself in the protagonist’s shoes and it’s a bit more difficult for me to do this for a man. It took me a little longer that I thought it would to get through this book. It’s no more than 180 pages, but it look me about two days. Le Guin introduced some pretty thought-provoking themes into her novel such as the importance of names, the true nature of good and evil, and the balance that is needed for the world to continue to turn. It’s pretty deep stuff for a fantasy novel but it’s presented in a way that is digestible for a younger reader. Le Guin takes the time to dwell on some heavier themes than normally seen in fantasy writing and I really appreciate the gravity that she was able to bring into the genre.

Because I’ve been spoiled by modern fantasy writing that is more detailed and action packed, I am not able to fully appreciate the ingenuity that Le Guin brought to the genre when A Wizard of Earthsea was first published. I would recommend this book for younger readers, around early adolescence. My father enjoyed the book far more than myself so perhaps a male reader would be more appreciative of the travails of Ged/Sparrowhawk the young protagonist.

Book Review: When in French

I read this book as part of a series of books that I’m reading at the moment on American expatriates who lived or currently live in France. I’m anticipating moving to France in a year or so and am currently trying to learn French as well as learn all that I can about the experiences of Americans in France. When I started to research the American expat experience, I turned to several well-known travel bloggers and collected book recommendations about it.

While Collins’ book is not actually about living in France, it details her journey to learn French, the primary language of her husband. The book itself is more of a meditation on language than it is a memoir. Collins delves into the intricacies of languages around the world, but also spends a large portion of the book reflecting on how language colors her own experience. By the end of the book, she finally feels empowered in her communication with her husband and is ready to start the new chapter of her life in Europe.

I would say that this book was good but the linguistic element did lose me at certain points. It’s rare that I put a book down once I begin and I found myself doing this multiple times while reading this book because I felt that I was not comprehending the content and that I needed a break. I found it to be more of a linguistic exploration rather than a memoir and would encourage those particularly interested in the history and development of language to read this. Because Collins lived in Switzerland rather than France, I felt that her living experience was not as relevant to my research. However, I really appreciated the time that she took to reflect upon the intricacies of the French language and will continue to reference her experience as I continue to learn the language myself.

Book Review: Royal Harlot

This was a good in-between more dense reads for me. One of the many books that I finished last week, I feel that it was more of a palate cleanser than anything else. “Royal Harlot” was a good, fun, and raunchy romp through the world of the Restoration Monarchy in the 17th century. The story is based off the life of Barbara Villiers, the first royal mistress of Charles the Second of England. A surprisingly sympathetic look at one of the most vilified women in English history, I appreciated both the nuance of the story and the incredibly racy sections. I would absolutely not recommend this for children but I did find it a good summer read for fans of historical fiction.

A note about where I got this book: I found this book while perusing the aisles of Beach Town Books in San Clemente, a lovely second-hand bookstore. While I love the scent of a new book, there are so many older books that need a good home and are much cheaper to buy the second time round. I really like the website Thrift Books because of the vast selection but there are an abundance of local second-hand bookstores that need your support! My favorites include Beach Town Books in San Clemente and the Book Escape in Baltimore. It’s also much nicer to your pocketbook in the long run so go and find a second hand bookshop near you!

Book Review: Kingdom of the Blind

I finished reading this several days ago and the more time that I’ve had to ponder the book, the more I’ve enjoyed it. Penny creates a lovable but morally questionable character in Inspector Armand Gamache and I thoroughly loved him and the rest of the crazy cast of characters. However, one mistake that I made with this novel was thinking that it was a stand-alone. I asked for it for Christmas and finally got around to it while sheltering at home and quickly realized that it was the third of a trilogy…..big oof. Despite it being the third book, Penny took care to introduce the entire cast of characters once again for the errant reader such as myself, who have stumbled upon her series a little late.

Penny creates quite a story and it gets a little difficult to keep track of all the action at certain points. The novel follows Gamache on a tale of two storylines, one where he is called upon to be the executor of the will of a mystery woman known as the Baroness, and the other where Gamache seeks redemption for his drug bust gone terribly wrong. To me, the drug bust storyline was the more interesting part of the novel especially as it featured a young woman, written in the style of Lisbeth Salander of the Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, in the title role. As someone who is also learning French, I found the little Quebecois phrases and quirks inserted into the book to be especially endearing. I also found a favorite character in Ruth, the grizzled and extremely boozy poet laureate of Three Pines. Ruth’s poetry was also woven throughout the novel in a very nice touch. I would recommend this book but I would definitely advise the reader to start with the first two novels in the series, “A Great Reckoning” and “Glass Houses”.